Wednesday, 6 July 2016

Web Magazine - JULY Issue 2016 - Rector's Pages

The Rector’s pages:
“Help and support each other” a reflection by Michael Hawkins, Reader.

It is all too easy to believe that we live in a society that has become shallow, corrupt and hedonistic, that we live in a secular society and one where religion is dying and where we worship those old gods of Mammon and Bacchus once more. We do sometimes feel that we are living in a moral vacuum, that we have lost that strong sense of right and wrong that we used to have. For too many life has become meaningless and without direction.

There was a time when we looked to our politicians to give us that sense of direction and purpose but past corruption scandals and inter-party bickering and with ever more confusing messages coming out of Westminster people are losing their faith in politicians as being the ones to put society back on its feet.

Our newspapers tell us that we have declining church attendance, declining numbers coming forward for ordination, fewer children being baptized, fewer weddings and fewer funerals in church. Yet our cathedrals are full, our city churches are flourishing and even our little rural churches still attract good congregations. We can still fill our little churches for the great festivals such as Christmas and Harvest, for weddings and funerals. Our churches are still at the very heart of our communities.

In this country we have a very broad church catering for all tastes. Our own churches offer a variety of services month after month and we have a real opportunity to fill that moral vacuum.  But to do so requires real conviction from us. Think of your best teacher when you were at school, the one that really inspired you. He or she was the teacher who loved their subject, firmly believed that it was the only one that really mattered and he or she was passionate about sharing it with you. 

If we can share that same passion, that same conviction about our faith, then we can gradually bring back meaning and hope and joy into peoples lives. They will see that life does have a purpose, does have meaning, and even our small village communities exist to help and support each other on our journey.

God of the ages, you are the beginning of our journey
and our strength as we pause along the way.
Hold us by the hand as we grow,
show us where to seek you, and guide our steps that we may find you.
Give us devoted hearts that we may love you, 
and your peace when we reach our journey's end.

DATES FOR YOUR DIARY

Sat 6th August - 10.00am - Dowlish Wake 
Coffee Morning, in church and Tower open to visitors


Wed 24th August - morning - Cudworth
The annual Cudworth Summer Market, in church

Sat 27th August - morning - Chillington
The annual Chillington Craft Fair,
 in SPEKE HALL DOWLISH WAKE




From the Church Registers
27th May     Diann and Peter Renny; ashes interred with Diann's (nee Vickery) ancestors at Kingstone.
27th May     Vivienne Brierley, latterly of Allowenshay, 91 yrs; funeral service and cremation at Taunton.
10th June    “George” Cohen, 62 yrs; funeral at Chillington Church and burial.
11th June     Mark Stephenson and Emily Copeland; joined in holy matrimony at Shepton Beauchamp.
15th June     Nora Tratt, 89 yrs; for 65 years a resident of Barrington; funeral service and cremation at Taunton.
18th June     Aaron Zaple and his infant son Korey; holy baptism at Kingstone.

From other records
23rd May     Serena Stevens; funeral service and cremation at Yeovil.



First Sunday Services - Sunday 7th August
08.45am  Dowlish Wake 1662 Communion
10.00am         Kingstone Worship 4 All
10.30am         Shepton         Modern sung Communion
11.150am Cudworth         Communion
6.00pm         Barrington Sung Evensong 



OTHER SERVICES


Sunday 31st July - 5th Sunday Services

10.30am   Puckington  Deanery Lammas Walk
Starting with a short service in Puckington Church, there will be a guided walk across local farm land finishing with tea and cake back at church.
All welcome; stout shoes/boots; dogs on leads (please pick up “poo”!).

6.00pm   Chillington   Summer Songs and Scenery
At Jubilee Field just off the A30
(travelling from the direction of Chard to Crewkerned, pass Windwhistle pub on your left, immediately after lay-by filled with gravel on left, turn left into the field)
Enjoy your favourite hymns and songs with a fantastic view towards Wales!
Light refreshments available.
+++++

Buttle Close Common Room - Shepton Beauchamp
We meet at 11.30am on the first Thursday of each month in the Common Room of Buttle Close for a short, gentle service of prayers, hymns, readings and a story.   Everyone is very welcome.
+++++

Weekday Communions
Shepton on Tuesdays at 10.30am.
These services are 30 minutes long, simple Communion Services to reflect, pray and give thanks.
+++++


Maybe . . We were supposed to meet the wrong people before meeting the right one so that, when we finally meet the right person, we will know how to be grateful for that gift. 

Maybe . . . When the door of happiness closes, another opens; but often we look so long at the closed door that we don't even see the new one which has been opened for us. 

Maybe . . . It is true that we don't know what we have until we lose it, but
it is also true that we don't know what we have been missing until it
arrives. 


NEW ARCHDEACON OF TAUNTON APPOINTED 
   The Right Reverend Peter Hancock, the Bishop of Bath and Wells has announced that the Rev Preb Simon Hill will be the next Archdeacon of Taunton. He replaces the Venerable John Reed who retired on 30 June after 37 years in ordained ministry. 

    Simon, who is currently Director of Clergy Development for the Diocese, will take up his appointment in the autumn. In the interim period, the Rev Dr Andrew Tatham will take on the responsibilities of the archdeacon. 
Bishop Peter said: “It is with great joy that I announce Simon’s appointment as Archdeacon of Taunton. He is, at heart, a pastor with a personal gift in developing the talents of others.” 
   As well as having responsibility for the effective operation of the archdeaconry and its lay and ordained ministers, Simon will also take on the role, currently held by Archdeacon John, of Warden of Readers and sit on the Bishop’s Staff. 
   Simon said: “I embark upon this new stage in my ministry at a challenging but exciting time for the Church. It has been a passion of mine to see people flourish in their lay or ordained ministry – people in the parishes I have served in and more recently in my diocesan role working with clergy, Readers and lay leaders. I look forward to getting to know and working with the church officers, parishes and communities in Taunton Archdeaconry, supporting them in the service of God and the sharing of the Gospel. I am also looking forward to taking on the role of Warden of Readers, working with the many committed Readers in the diocese as we look to the future, building on a 150 year tradition of mission and evangelism.” 
   Before his ordination Simon Hill taught at schools in Zimbabwe, Northumberland and Malawi. After training at Ripon College Cuddesdon, he served his curacy in Leeds before returning to Oxfordshire in the role of Team Vicar in the Dorchester Team and Director of the Cuddesdon Berinsfield programme where ordinands engaged with the practicalities of parish ministry and the theological principles behind them. He moved to North Somerset in 2003 to become Rector of Backwell with Chelvey and Brockley. He became Director of Clergy Development for the Diocese of Bath and Wells in 2010. 
About the Diocese of Bath & Wells: 
   The Diocese stretches from Portishead in the north to Crewkerne in the south, Minehead in the west to Frome in the east. Our two bishops, three archdeacons, 300 clergy, 540 churches, 180 schools, 496 parishes and 370 lay Readers serve nearly 900,000 people. 
About the Taunton Archdeaconry: 
   The Taunton Archdeaconry covers the south and west of the Diocese of Bath and Wells: from north of Bridgwater to Exmoor’s Doone Valley, and along the border with Devon to Crewkerne. There are 191 churches and chapels within 186 parishes and 54 benefices. 


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