Saturday, 30 May 2020

WEB MAGAZINE - July



Rector’s Pages for July: 

HURRAY FOR THE WEB MAGAZINE!
 The Association for Church Editors is pleased to tell us that the Web Magazine has been awarded a Certificate of Achievement in the 2020 competition for magazines using black and white printing, and they have sent the editors a certificate for this. This means that our magazine reached a high standard. We would normally present this as a framed certificate during the AGM, but obviously we are unable to do that this year.  Well done to the Web editorial team!



PRAYER FOR BEGINNERS - Part 2 - Praying for the world
  One of the sides of prayer that we’re often most comfortable thinking about is that of prayer for other people. The traditional name for this is intercession and it’s a vital part of our life as Christians. In the Lord’s Prayer we pray for the world first, and only then for our own needs; this isn’t a bad pattern to keep to in all of our prayers.

What happens when we pray?
  The short answer is that we don’t really know! We know that prayer isn’t meant to be some kind of magic we work on God to make him do what we want. At the same time, Jesus told us several times that we should be persistent and disciplined in praying, to keep going when prayers don’t seem to be answered.
  Perhaps the best way to see it is that prayer is how God somehow allows us to share in his work in the world. When we can’t affect a situation in any other way, we can still share in what God is doing through others. When we have the opportunity to help someone or to make a difference ourselves, then we seek God’s help and strength to do so, trusting that his work through us will somehow lead to more than we would achieve by our own efforts alone.
Often this has as much to do with allowing God to shape our thoughts as it does with ‘getting our prayers right’ in the first place. St Paul in his letter to the Romans says that God the Holy Spirit actually prays to God the Father from within us. When we don’t know what to pray (or even what to think) about a situation, God can take over and include us in his conversation with himself! Prayer for others can be a wonderful but challenging experience if we listen to ourselves and to God as we pray.

How can we pray?
  It’s good to be specific in your prayer, and to stick at it. It might help to have a list of people and situations that you’ll pray for, and refer to it regularly. If there are many things on your prayer list, don’t try to rush through them all every time. Part of this prayer is to concentrate on what you’re bringing to mind and to God, and rushing through things tends to feel a bit like a shopping list! It’s probably better to spread things over a few days or a week – though there may be a few people or situations you’ll want to pray for every day.  There are other parts to prayer, but one way or another it’s good to let yourself be still for a few minutes. First ask the Holy Spirit to help you to pray. You might read a bit of the Bible or use the prayer from the weekly Service at Home leaflets to help yourself to come closer to God. Then just use your list or whatever else is on your mind to ask God to do what’s right and best in each situation – even if what’s best isn’t actually what you yourself would want.
  You don’t need elegant words, or even any words at all – bringing together your focussed concern for others and your trust in God (however weak that feels!) is what matters.

Ideas for prayer
  Start with what matters most to you, whether people, parts of the world or any kind of issue. The more it matters to you, the easier it’ll be to keep praying.
  Then use the news! Whether you read a paper, watch TV news or listen to the radio, take a note (at least mentally!) of anything you’d like to pray for. You could even get into the habit, if it’s quiet when the news is on, of praying as you read, listen or watch. It may affect the way you think about the world.
   Most Christian charities and mission agencies are happy to provide monthly or quarterly prayer lists, to let you know about some of the areas in which they work, and to help to focus your prayers. Contact any you already support by giving, and ask to receive these if you don’t already.

A couple of warnings and an encouragement
  First, don’t be surprised if the answers that come to your prayers aren’t always the answers you would like. God does answer prayer, but not always with a straightforward ‘yes’. Sometimes his answer can be the gift of strength to accept a different situation from the one we would have chosen.
  Second, look out. If you’re praying for a person or a situation, God may challenge you to do something else about it. Be ready to find that you’re meant to be part of the answer to your own prayer!
  Lastly, do talk to others. We all keep learning, and advice from how someone else has found they can pray, may be very useful.


TAKE TIME
Take time to be still, to look, to hear and to see God in creation. Think of new ways of being church to your neighbours. New ways of reaching out by picking up the phone and saying hello are you alright do you need help, are you coping.

God of healing,
Surround us with your love 
as together we negotiate the complexities of coronavirus.
Guide us all as we seek to support one another. 
Help us to be attentive to the lonely, the isolated, 
the fearful and those who are ill.
Mindful of the geographical isolation of many rural communities, 
we pray for everyone involved in the effective provision of food, 
medical supplies and pastoral care.
In the name of Jesus Christ, who walks alongside us in our difficulties.
Amen



THINKING ANGLICANS - An article By Rev’d Gerry Reilly

I hope that the time after coronavirus will be one where the church will begin to see itself as a sign of the presence of God in our community, loving, serving, blessing all in the community irrespective of age, sex, means. Ministry means service, being alongside, suffering with, not offering answers to questions people haven't asked, but encouraging them to ask questions of themselves, their society, their church, and their God. Clergy are primarily disciples, deacons, servants, not functionaries or hierarchy.

People are asking for respect, love, acceptance, a listening ear, real deep healing, and that is what we need to train our ordinands in, not purveyors of gimmicks or easy answers, which make us feel superior and them inferior. 

Jesus made people feel better about themselves, eg.the Samaritan woman, the demon-possessed man who lived in the grave-yards, the blind man in the temple, the sinner-woman who anointed Jesus' feet, etc. The only disgruntled people were the ones who had all the answers and thought they were right and that God must be on their side.
And Jesus did not do away from the synagogues or even the temple; he simply alerted us to their right use.  We need the people at the top to give us the right example: maybe an inversion of the pyramid.


LIGHT AT THE END OF THE TUNNEL!
We know that many of you have missed being able to go into the church and so we are pleased to announce that we are starting on the road to properly   re-opening our church buildings.

From Monday 15th June some of our churches were open for individual prayer only, by any member of the public.  We are not allowed to hold public acts of worship just yet.

Opening up is welcome but it does create some practical issues and those will shape exactly how/when we open. Of chief concern is keeping everyone safe by making sure that the church does not itself become a cause of transmitting the infection. So the arrangements we put in place are necessarily a balance between opening as much as possible for people and the necessary precautions to keep those who do come in safe.

That balance point is determined by the necessity for cleaning and our capacity to carry it out. The more the church is open, the more cleaning is needed and the shorter the down time to do it in. And then there is the question of who will do the cleaning. Some of our churches will try and manage this on a daily basis; others will try opening one or two days a week; others just one day; some are not able to manage this at all.  The advice we have been given is that preventative cleaning is not necessary if we allow 72 hours between times that the church is open.

SO PLEASE when you visit the church, please observe the usual social distancing rules, use the hand sanitisers, and some churches may restrict the areas that you can access. Please remember that this is for everyone’s safety and to try to prevent the possibility of the virus being spread further. 

There will of course be cleaning, but you should be aware that surfaces such as door handles and seats may not have been cleaned since the previous member of the public came into contact with them.  For this reason we ask that you make use of the hand sanitiser in the church porch before entering and after leaving the church.  No one from the church can be present to monitor things, so we are asking you to STAY ALERT and CONTROL THE VIRUS, please.

This is a first step towards restoring services and we will update you as and when restrictions are further eased.

Rev’d Geoff Wade, Rector/Area Dean     
01460 240 228      gw@winsmoor.plus.com



THEFTS OF LEAD FROM CHURCH ROOFS - LATEST NEWS

Three men have been charged in connection with a series of lead thefts from churches across Somerset.

In a joint investigation with Lincolnshire Police, the three men have been charged with conspiracy to steal between August 2018 and March 2020. The charge partly relates to 11 offences of theft from churches in our force area

Paul Buica, aged 25, of George Street, Birmingham; Constantine Motescu, aged 31, of Sutton Hill, Telford and Laurentiu Sucea, aged 37, also of George Street, Birmingham, will next appear before Lincoln Magistrates’ Court on 11 June.

The thefts connected with this charge in the Somerset area are:

• Church of St Mary, Chesterblade, between 21-28 August 2019
• Church of St Edward King and Martyr, Goathurst, Bridgwater, between 18-19 December 2019
• Church of the Holy Cross, Middlezoy, Bridgwater, between 11-12 February 2020
• St Mary’s Church, Glastonbury, between 14-15 February 2019
• St Mary’s Church, Barrington, Ilminster, between 18-19 February 2020
• St Peter’s Church, Ilton, Ilminster, between 20-21 February 2020
• St Giles’ Church, Bradford on Tone, Taunton, between 26-27 February 2020
• Church of St Andrew and St Mary, Pitminster, between 27-28 February 2020
• St John the Baptist Church, Wellington, between 28-29 February 2020
• St Peter and St Paul’s Church, South Petherton, between 4-5 March 2020
• Church of St Andrew and St Mary, Pitminster, on 9 March 2020


Villages websites:

BARRINGTON - barringtonvillage.btck.co.uk
DOWLISH WAKE - dowliswake.com
KINGSTONE - kingstoneparish.org
STOCKLINCH - stocklinch.org.uk 
SHEPTON BEAUCHAMP - sheptonbeauchamp.org.uk




June's Web Articles




Dear Parishioner:
   
  I hope you are not too confused by the government changes to the coronavirus restrictions which came into effect in the middle of May!  You may be aware that there have been some very minor changes (and they are very minor) to the rules over our closed and locked churches, which in a nutshell means that they are still closed and locked to almost everyone (including me!), except for one or two people who can go inside to check on the building, to say a prayer, etc.  Otherwise, I’m afraid they are still closed and locked to almost all of us.   
  Whilst this is a terrible situation to be in, the government and national church leadership are gravely concerned about the virus re-emerging as restrictions are lifted, which would take us back to where we were in March!  Additionally there has been a very low infection rate in Somerset (and Cornwall) and the authorities aren’t sure whether this is because we are mainly rural and therefore good at social distancing, or if we are still to see the peak of infections and deaths.
  We are probably looking at quite a lengthy period before we are able to go back to public worship in the way we used to do.
  So for the time being, it’s business as has become normal for our churches, but as soon as anything changes, I’ll let you know.

Stay safe and well.  

Yours sincerely,

Geoff   


God of healing,
Surround us with your love 
as together we negotiate the complexities of coronavirus.
Guide us all as we seek to support one another. 
Help us to be attentive to the lonely, the isolated, 
the fearful and those who are ill.
Mindful of the geographical isolation of many rural communities, 
we pray for everyone involved in the effective provision of food, 
medical supplies and pastoral care.
In the name of Jesus Christ, who walks alongside us in our difficulties.
Amen.


PENTECOST - WHIT SUNDAY - 31st May
   Pentecost is the day that the church was born. Christ was crucified, rose again, spent thirty days with His disciples, then ascended to heaven. Pentecost immediately followed. For two millennia, Christians have been celebrating the church’s birthday with joy and exuberance. Pentecost Sunday takes place 40 days after Easter Sunday. Originally, Pentecost was a Jewish holiday what was held 50 days after Passover as one of the major Jewish feasts. This is how it all began..

Background of Pentecost Sunday
  Believed to be the oldest feast in the Church, the story of Pentecost dates back to the first century A.D. The feast of Pentecost coincided with the Jewish Feast of Weeks, which occurs 50 days after the Passover (Deuteronomy 16:10). According to Jewish tradition, the Ten Commandments were given to Moses 50 days after the first Passover, which freed the Hebrews from their bondage in Egypt. As the Hebrews settled into Canaan, the feast became a time to honour the Lord for blessing the fruits of their labours. 
  At the time of Jesus, the festival focused on rabbinical law and traditions. Since this Jewish holiday took place at the same time of the Pentecost, many Jewish Christians appropriated its celebration into their Christian commemoration of the coming of the Spirit.

Story of Pentecost
   In John 14:16-18 Jesus tells His disciples that the Holy Spirit would come after Him:  “And I will ask the Father, and he will give you another Advocate, to be with you for ever. This is the Spirit of truth, whom the world cannot receive, because it neither sees him nor knows him. You know him, because he abides with you, and he will be in you. ‘I will not leave you orphaned; I am coming to you.’ “ 
  The Book of Acts provides us with the starting details and events that took place to bring the church into being.  40 days after Jesus’ death and resurrection, and 10 days after Jesus ascended into heaven, the promise of the Holy Spirit came to be.  120 disciples who had been praying together for 10 days, and then:
  “When the day of Pentecost had come, they were all together in one place. And suddenly from heaven there came a sound like the rush of a violent wind, and it filled the entire house where they were sitting. Divided tongues, as of fire, appeared among them, and a tongue rested on each of them. All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other languages, as the Spirit gave them ability.”  (Acts 2.1-4)
  These events are what started the church. Crowds came to investigate what was going on and Peter spoke to them about Jesus saying:
  “Repent, and be baptised every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ so that your sins may be forgiven; and you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit. For the promise is for you, for your children, and for all who are far away, everyone whom the Lord our God calls to him. (Acts 2:38-39) 
  From the crowds, 3,000 realized the truth of Peter’s words and became followers of Jesus. The outpouring of the Holy Spirit came and resulted in tongues, prophecy, miracles, salvations, and the birth of countless churches, worldwide.

Villages websites:

BARRINGTON - barringtonvillage.btck.co.uk
DOWLISH WAKE - dowliswake.com
KINGSTONE - kingstoneparish.org
STOCKLINCH - stocklinch.org.uk 
SHEPTON BEAUCHAMP - sheptonbeauchamp.org.uk



From the Church Registers

4th May  Joyce Brice, 85 years; one of the last residents of Barrington to be born and live their whole life in the village.  A graveside funeral service with a few of her nearest and dearest, at Barrington Church.



Prayer for beginners: Part 1 (And we’re all beginners...)

   Prayer is a basic part of life as a Christian.  We pray in church, at home, together, on our own.  We offer thanks to God, ask his forgiveness when we get things wrong, pray for people we care about and much more.  Often we pray ‘on the spur of the moment’, responding to situations as we meet them. Choosing to pray in a disciplined way, though, is a step further in life with God.
  There are lots of patterns of prayer which we can use, and I’ll try to write a bit about some of them over the coming months.  One thing is vital if you’re going to build a pattern of prayer – time.  It doesn’t need to be a lot, but you need to set aside at least a few minutes regularly, and to make yourself do it – even if that means leaving some other things undone for the moment.
  Get yourself comfortable, and don’t feel that you need to rush straight into praying.  Often it helps to spend a few moments being still and breathing deeply to let your mind slow down a bit.
  Then comes the praying part.  If you’re trying to get started in this, why not use the prayer Jesus taught us?  It’s both a wonderful prayer in itself and a great pattern for our own prayers.

Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name;
thy kingdom come; thy will be done; on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread.  
And forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us.
And lead us not into temptation; but deliver us from evil.
For thine is the kingdom, the power and the glory, for ever and ever. Amen.

  From early on in the church, it’s been recommended that we stop to pray this prayer at least three times a day – on rising, at mid-day and in the evening. Try praying it slowly and thoughtfully this way for a few days.
  Then take a bit longer, and perhaps once a day, stop after each line to think and pray about the kind if things the prayer mentions.  So after ‘Our Father in heaven’ just take a moment to think about God – what do you believe he is like? Ask him to help you to know.  After ‘Hallowed be your Name’, think of three things to praise and thank God about. Think through what each line of the prayer means, and spend a few moments praying about those things.
Try this for a week, and see how you feel about prayer then!





SUNDAY SERVICES IN CHURCH

  The Archbishop’s of Canterbury and York have decreed that there will be no public worship in Church of England Churches until further notice.  All our churches are closed and there are no services within their walls.

  A weekly service sheet is sent out by the Rector every Friday morning, which has readings, prayers, and a short reflection; the idea behind this is that we can all join together in prayer on Sunday (or throughout the week!), using the same material.  Though we cannot meet physically, we can do so spiritually.  “The Lord is here; his spirit is with us”

Saturday, 2 May 2020

WEB MAGAZINE - May

SUNDAY SERVICES IN CHURCH

The Archbishop’s of Canterbury and York have decreed that there will be no public worship in Church of England Churches until further notice.  All our churches are closed and there are no services within their walls.

A weekly service sheet is sent out by the Rector every Friday morning, which has readings, prayers, and a short reflection; the idea behind this is that we can all join together in prayer on Sunday (or throughout the week!), using the same material.  Though we cannot meet physically, we can do so spiritually.  “The Lord is here; his spirit is with us”


FUNERALS

The current situation with the coronavirus lockdown means that groups of people should not meet together unless they live in the same household; this makes arranging funerals extremely difficult.   As Clergy, we normally try to help people deal with the sorrow of parting from a loved one and this care continues, however there are now added complications.

1.  Only very close relatives can attend the funeral “service” and usually this number has to be kept as low as possible (in the region of 12 or so, or less).
2.  The funeral either takes place in the open beside the grave or outside the family home if a cremation is planned (as most - but not all - crematorium’s can’t allow people inside the building).

The pain and agony of these restrictions is well understood and we will continue do everything we can to help and support grieving families.  If you are in any doubt or worried about this, please do get in touch.

What we are hoping to do, once the restrictions are fully lifted, is to offer each family a proper “Thanksgiving Service” in our churches when we will be able to fully celebrate and give thanks for the lives that we have loved and lost.  Please do talk to us if you think you would like to do this.

Watch, O Lord, with those who wake, or watch, or weep tonight, 
and give your angels charge over those who sleep.
Tend your sick ones, O Lord Christ.
Rest your weary ones.  Bless your dying ones.  Soothe your suffering ones.
Pity your afflicted ones.  Shield your joyous ones, and all for your love's sake. Amen.


Rector’s Pages: 

The transforming power of Jesus in troubled times

In recent weeks, we have collectively grown closer to understanding the impact of sickness and suffering in our lives, families and communities.  In addition, we have our own experiences of sickness and sadness other than the tragedy of the Covid-19 virus.  As Christians, we know with assurance that Jesus brings resurrection despite our despair.  It is natural to experience struggle in our human fragility through terrible affliction, and it is important to acknowledge our own grief and pain.

When we pray with others, we bring our authentic selves, the strong and fragile, faithful and lacking sides together, fixing our eyes on Jesus who is the name above all names. We are used in our humility by Him for the restoration of health and wholeness.  Paradoxically our human weakness qualifies us to be used as channels for God’s healing.  The cost of coming alongside others can ‘take it out of us’.  We therefore have serious responsibility to look after our health, physically, psychologically and replenish spiritually.

It is with focus on Jesus’s power that I bring your attention to the story of the woman who suffered for twelve years with a haemorrhage, exhausted from all hope of healing.  This bleeding caused physical weakness, made her ritually unclean and her life was emptying away from her.  There was no National Health Service in those days, or blood transfusions.  The woman was wanting a cure and had heard about Jesus the miracle worker.   She crept up behind Jesus but dared not touch him because she believed she might make Him unclean.  However, then she does dare to touch the edge of his cloak.  Jesus instantly knew and said, ‘Someone did touch me; I know that power has gone out from me.’   Jesus felt her touch and His healing power flowed into her.  He felt power leave him and yet he also knew well how to resource himself.

For those of us who feel called to love through Jesus’s healing ministry, we too may feel energy go out of us as we undertake His work.  It is therefore essential to be able to ‘touch Jesus’ cloak’ ourselves and to know his power will flow into us too, as well as those we pray for.   It is a necessary two-way experience for giver and recipient for ongoing healing and transformation.  
In this current world crisis, we are learning that we are all equal, learning about our transgressions and finding ways of helping each other.  Isn’t it unifying that, even though socially distanced, we seem so connected and we all earnestly and desperately seek healing and restoration?  As Christians who seek God’s power to ‘put us right’, ‘touching His cloak’, will aid us to walk with someone else towards their fullness of health.   However, in our willingness to surrender, in the power of His resurrection we offer ourselves in meekness to his mercy and healing.

With thanks for this article to Sally Walters, 
Advisor in Counselling and Wellbeing, Diocese of Bath and Wells

God of healing,
Surround us with your love 
as together we negotiate the complexities of coronavirus.
Guide us all as we seek to support one another. 
Help us to be attentive to the lonely, the isolated, 
the fearful and those who are ill.
Mindful of the geographical isolation of many rural communities, 
we pray for everyone involved in the effective provision of food, 
medical supplies and pastoral care.
In the name of Jesus Christ, who walks alongside us in our difficulties.
Amen.



Villages websites:

BARRINGTON - barringtonvillage.btck.co.uk
DOWLISH WAKE - dowliswake.com
KINGSTONE - kingstoneparish.org
STOCKLINCH - stocklinch.org.uk 
SHEPTON BEAUCHAMP - sheptonbeauchamp.org.uk



From the Church Registers

24th March  “Tony” Welch 84 years; brought home to Shepton Beauchamp after a long absence, to be buried near his family.

ON THE LIGHTER SIDE - SOME OLD BUT TRUE RULES....

Law of Mechanical Repair 
After your hands become coated with grease, your nose will begin to itch and you’ll need to pee.
Law of Gravity
Any tool, nut, bolt, screw, when dropped, will roll to the least accessible place in the universe.
Law of Probability
The probability of being watched is directly proportional to the stupidity of your act.
Law of Random Numbers
If you dial a wrong number, you never get a busy signal; someone always answers.
Law of Variation
If you change lines or traffic lanes, the one you were in will always move faster than the one you are in now.
Law of the Bath
When the body is fully immersed in water, the telephone will ring.
Law of Close Encounters
The probability of meeting someone you know increases dramatically when you are with someone you don’t want to be seen with.
Law of the Result
When you try to prove to someone that a machine won’t work, it will.
Law of Biomechanics
The severity of the itch is inversely proportional to the reach.
Law of the Theatre or Football Stadium
At any event, the people whose seats are furthest from the aisle, always arrive last.  They are the ones who leave their seats several times to go for food and drinks or the loo and who leave early before the end of the event.  The folks in the aisle seats come early, never move, have long gangly legs or big bellies and stay to the bitter end.
Law of Coffee
As soon as you sit down to a cup of hot coffee, your boss will ask you to do something which will last until the coffee is cold.
Law of Lockers
If there are only two people in a locker room, they will have lockers adjacent to each other.
Law of Physical Surfaces 
The chances of an open jam sandwich landing face down on the floor is directly correlated to the newness and expense of the carpet.
Law of Logical Argument
Anything is possible IF you don’t know what you’re talking about.
Law of Physical Appearance
If the clothes fit, they are ugly.
Law of Public Speaking
A closed mouth gathers no feet.
Law of Commercial Marketing Strategy
As soon as you find a product that you really like, they will stop making it.









Thursday, 13 February 2020

WEB MAGAZINE - April

April Rectors pages:

SERVICES IN CHURCH

The Archbishop’s of Canterbury and York have decreed that there will be no public worship in Church of England Churches until further notice.

At the usual service times (displayed as always on the back page of this Web magazine), a member of clergy or a Church Warden will be offering prayers and thanksgiving.

Churches will be open as usual during normal daylight hours. 
(Puckington remains locked because of repeated thefts)


Rector’s Pages: 

As I write this article in the 20th March, the situation with regards to the coronavirus has been ramping up, this evening severe restrictions have just been put in place.  By the time you get to read this in early April things may well have moved on significantly, however.....

At this time, all the kind and generous folk of our villages are becoming organised to help those who will be house-bound and isolated during this emergency; we are very lucky to have such wonderful folk, and so many of them.  There are lots of volunteers in each village and they can be found by asking friends and neighbours to put you in touch with them.  We are aware that not everyone is computer literate, but some villages have been able to put help pages on their village websites (which are listed below).

In talking about this need to help and be helped, we have all been very aware of two very relevant potential issues - security and trust.  Security - it is never a good idea to post personal details on social media or too share them with people you do not know.  Trust - there are some bad folk out there, so if YOU are asking for help, PLEASE do make sure you know and trust that person .... NEVER accept help from someone you don’t know, or who just turns up or contacts you out of the blue.

We all also aware of all our small businesses, especially those in the food services industry, who are really struggling.  A special message to them, “Don’t give up - we villagers value you and your contribution to our community life - we will do everything we can to support you”

Do look after yourselves, whether you are a helper or being helped.


Villages websites:

BARRINGTON - barringtonvillage.btck.co.uk
DOWLISH WAKE - dowliswake.com
KINGSTONE - kingstoneparish.org
STOCKLINCH - stocklinch.org.uk 
SHEPTON BEAUCHAMP - sheptonbeauchamp.org.uk

Watch, O Lord, with those who wake, or watch, or weep tonight, 
and give your angels charge over those who sleep.
Tend your sick ones, O Lord Christ.
Rest your weary ones.
Bless your dying ones.
Soothe your suffering ones.
Pity your afflicted ones.
Shield your joyous ones, and all for your love's sake. Amen.


Dear Friends - From Father Mark Jackson

We live indeed in strange times. Our current situation presents us with unprecedented challenges with opportunities to extend the love that God shows us; to share in acts of kindness and support. Practical measures are called for. The simplest and the most effective is to contact a neighbour, friend, family member by telephone. Emails too are good, but the warm encouragement of the human voice and the chance to talk, makes an inroad into people’s lives. We call, they respond. They and us are therefore not in isolation. With movement restricted, the call can go out regularly. This way we include not exclude, we can respond to their needs, listen to their concerns and be compassionate. We can laugh with then, cry with them, reassure them and keep them close. We can even pray for them and with them. New initiatives that reach out, can show others that we really care. This is the Christian love we believe in.
It is difficult to anticipate how long the crisis will last, but don’t worry about tomorrow, think simply about today’s needs.
The Lord reached out to all within and without. He showed no preference to one or another, but demonstrated a universal love for all, discovered in service, healing and wholeness. We could all do with a bit of that.
My friends, take courage, trust in the Lord and love one another. Take care of yourselves, and those within your borders.
May the Lord send you his blessing in these trying times. The churches will be open for private prayer and reflection. Light a candle (where available) for our broken world. Listen to the bell ringing out whilst the clergy say their prayers daily. Reflect upon the joy of Easter to come, the sign of God’s presence amongst us and a hope that springs eternal.
Please feel free to contact the clergy for a private chat or guidance in prayer.


OTHER SERVICES 

Sunday at 5th April 5.00pm   CANCELLED
An experiment in worship!


Weekday Services - no public week day services


DATES FOR YOUR DIARY:  
Cudworth Wednesday 29th April, 7.00pm in church
Cheese and Wine Party
CANCELLED

Shepton Beauchamp - Friday 8th May - 2.00pm
VE Day Teddy Parachute Jump from the church tower
CANCELLED

Kingstone Church - Saturday 9th May - morning
Annual May Fair in the Churchyard and Church
CANCELLED
Dowlish Wake - Sunday 17th May - 2.30pm
The annual Plant Sale at the Pavilion
CANCELLED



Annual Bluebell Wood Walk for Rogation time
Sunday 3rd May
Cudworth to Chillington through the Bluebell Wood
CANCELLED



CHURCH ANNUAL GENERAL MEETINGS:  ALL CANCELLED
Stocklinch - Monday 30th March 7.15pm in the Village Hall
Dowlish Wake - Thursday 2nd April, 7.00pm in church
Chillington - Monday 6th April, 7.00pm in church
Kingstone - Monday 27 April7.00pm in church
Barrington - Tuesday 28th April, 7.00pm in church
Cudworth - Wednesday 29th April, 7.00pm in church
Puckington - Tuesday 5th May, 7.30pm at Barn End
Shepton Beauchamp - Tuesday 12th May, 7.00pm in church


From the Church Records:

22nd February   Aston Martin, holy baptism at his family’s home church, Dowlish Wake.
12th March   John Rowswell, 60 years; funeral service and burial at his family church in Barrington.
16th March   David Harrup, 80 years; Service at Yeovil Crematorium, followed by a Thanksgiving service at Barrington Church.
18th March   Anne Rolaff, 78 years; a much loved lady from Barrington who was cremated at Taunton; her thanksgiving party has been delayed because of the Coronavirus.
24th March  “Tony” Welch 84 years; brought home to Shepton Beauchamp after a long absence, to be buried near his family.


Chaplaincy Update from Wadham School - Abby Lintern, Chaplain

   Firstly, my apologies that it has been so long since the last report, I’m not quite sure where the time goes!  The last term has been a busy one at school and personally, with my time at Bristol Baptist College drawing to a close in May this year.
   Most of my time at school is filled with meeting with students for mentoring.  It’s a real joy and privilege to be able to sit and listen to these young people to learn about their lives and to be able to speak words of encouragement over them.
   Each day that I am in school there is a regular group of about 8 students who come and spend break and lunchtimes in the chaplaincy space.  Often just chatting about their days.  However, through these times relationships of trust have been built and I have been able to support them in lots of life’s ups and downs in the past few months.  I think the doughnuts and hot chocolate help too!
   Since Christmas I have been producing PowerPoint slides for each tutor to use in their tutor time when not in collective worship, with a Thought for the Week.  Each week these slides help them to think about a current issue, reflect on a bible verse, or to think about behaviour to help the school community be a better place for everyone.
   For my report this time I have asked Matthew Gardner (Head Teacher) for the things that he would like to ask the churches to pray for.  These are below, I hope you will feel able to join me in supporting Matthew and the school community in praying for these things over the coming weeks.  
   Once again thank you for your support and encouragement.   It’s wonderful to know that I have the prayer as well as financial support from the local churches, it really does help.  If you would like to know more about my role then please do get in touch with me;  alintern@wadhamschool.co.uk 

Please Pray for :- 
1. Clarity from local authority around changes needed to ensure sustainable schools going forward. 
2.For Y11 and Y13 as they come up to GCSE and A Level exam season. That they won’t be panicking or too nervous but confident in demonstrating their learning. 
3. For staff, that they will feel valued and encouraged in all they do to support the young people in our care. 
4.For parents in their difficult task and that they will ask for help, when they need it.


FOR DOWLISH WAKE 


St. Andrew’s Church, Dowlish Wake – Prayer Board
The Prayer board is near the font.
Please place any prayers for healing on the board 
and these will be included during the weekly
Wednesday morning prayer time.  










March Rector’s Pages:  This month written by Fr Mark Jackson

Dear friends:

It’s really good to be alive and kicking. 

Having just passed through Candlemas at the start of February, where Jesus as a child is presented in the temple, we see the potential in old man Simeon’s eyes, of what is to come (Luke 2.22-40). It’s all about Light and Illumination. 

If ever you want to see the meaning in a phrase and can’t quite get there, ask the opposite question. So simply who wants to live in perpetual darkness? You would be clearly mad. But seeking the light, bringing illumination to others by kind deeds, small acts of kindness, which may not seem to onerous for us, but to the recipient, it can be a life changing experience. Most of it has something to do with taking the time to bother, for contact with others is one of the most important things we can offer. And it’s free!

But why bother, what benefit is it to us? Turn the question upside down again.
If God had not bothered with the human race, we are left to our own devices, but I’m not bright enough to see where that goes. Consider God’s intervention into our life, and the consequences are true and unlimited compassion, the desire to walk the extra mile and simply to love one another. It’s so extraordinary and generous, it’s time to take time out and do a bit of good old fashioned reflection.

Lent has just started and this gives us the chance to consider the generosity of God and our own interpretation of this. A world without kindness, compassion and action is not one I wish to be in. Yet, small reminders of beauty surround us. One of my favourite flowers is the snowdrop. It blooms such simple flowers, yet its impact raises our spirits. Against all the odds, however cold and miserable, it grows, inspires and sends a clear message of better things to come, more potential. Whilst short lived, the difference they demonstrate is alarming. How much more if we are the receiver of such a simple gesture of your kindness. Never underestimate impact. It’s all around us, but even better when you give it away.


FIRST SUNDAY SERVICES

Sunday 5th April - Palm Sunday 
Barrington - 5.00pm Experimental Worship in Barrington Church
Cudworth - 11.15am Modern Communion
Dowlish Wake - 08.45am 1662 Communion 
Kingstone - 10.00am Family Service
Shepton Beauchamp - 10.30am Modern Communion



OTHER SERVICES 

FIFTH SUNDAY - 29th March

“Passiontide” begins the preparations for Easter
Chillington 10.00am Family Service
Shepton Beauchamp 10.30am Sung High Mass
Puckington 6.00pm 1662 Evensong

Sunday at 5th April 5.00pm
An experiment in worship!

During the very cold winter months we have been experimenting with a different form of worship and have very much enjoyed the warmth and hospitality of the Barrington Boar - big thank you to the licensees Alasdair and Victoria.

Now that the warmer weather is returning (fingers crossed) we will be heading back to church HOWEVER, we will be retaining the time (5.00pm) and the style of worship we have been trying out ........ this is a Celtic style of worship where we think about God, nature and humanity being very closely linked, with music from the Taize Community of France.  

The service is a time of music, prayer, readings and refreshment (both spiritual and tea and cake refeshment!).

This service has proved to be very popular, so why not come along and see what you think?  It is open to everyone, not just Barringtonians!










Weekday Services

Shepton on Tuesdays at 10.30am.
The venue changes as we meet in peoples homes and have a cuppa afterwards; ring Rev’d Geoff (240228) if you’d like to come along.
This service is a 20 minutes, simple Communion Service.
+++++

Dowlish Wake on Wednesdays at 8.30am
More details: Jayne Hinds on 55748, or email: jayne.hinds@btinternet.com
+++++

Buttle Close Common Room - Shepton Beauchamp
We meet at 11.30am on the first Thursday of each month in the Common Room of Buttle Close for a short, gentle service of prayers, hymns, readings and a story.   Everyone is very welcome.
+++++


DATES FOR YOUR DIARY:  

Friday 3rd April - Puckington Church Bingo 
in BARRINGTON Village Hall (in the evening)

Saturday 4th April - Kingstone Church Barn Dance
in SEAVINGTON Village Hall (in the evening)













LENT COURSES:

Lent began on 26th February and this year there are three courses available.

Canon Ian Gibson is offering the following:

Held in Shepton Beauchamp church, for four Wednesdays evenings starting on Wed 4th March ;“Unravelling the mystery of the CofE in about 40  minutes!”
The curious titles we use for those who serve – Rector or Vicar? – Curate Deacon, Ordinand, Bishop etc etc.
Why on earth do we use such names as Parish, Deanery, Diocese, Provinces, Livings etc etc.
Morning Prayer or Mattins, Said or Sung, Mass or Lords Supper – any difference?, etc etc.
What are saints and apostles, disciples, martyrs. Commemorations – does the lectionary make sense to a layman – what’s a lectionary!

Starting with tea and buns and ending with short night prayer…..

Reader Jayne Hinds is offering two Lent courses over 5 weeks in March

1. 'Redeeming Love': 5 sessions using Lent-themed paintings to informally explore something of God's loving purposes through Jesus' final days. This will be available on Tuesday afternoons or evenings, beginning on 3rd March.

2. 'Finding a Voice': 5 sessions based on the film 'The King's Speech'. This will be available on Wednesday afternoons or evenings, beginning 4th March.

Both take place at Bridge Cottage, Dowlish Wake, TA19 0NY. Home-made refreshments on arrival and the session lasts for 1 hour.

Spaces are limited so if you are interested, please email Jayne on jayne.hinds@btinternet.com or telephone 01460 55748 and leave a message with your contact details.






From the Church Records:

23 January   Betty Robins of Dowlish Wake, funeral service at Yeovil Crematorium.




FOR DOWLISH WAKE PAGES PLEASE


St. Andrew’s Church, Dowlish Wake – Prayer Board
The Prayer board is near the font.
Please place any prayers for healing on the board 
and these will be included during the weekly
Wednesday morning prayer time.  



FOR BARRINGTON PAGES PLEASE


Sunday at 5th April 5.00pm
An experiment in worship!

During the very cold winter months we have been experimenting with a different form of worship and have very much enjoyed the warmth and hospitality of the Barrington Boar - big thank you to the licensees Alasdair and Victoria.

Now that the warmer weather is returning (fingers crossed) we will be heading back to church HOWEVER, we will be retaining the time (5.00pm) and the style of worship we have been trying out ........ this is a Celtic style of worship where we think about God, nature and humanity being very closely linked, with music from the Taize Community of France.  

The service is a time of music, prayer, readings and refreshment (both spiritual and tea and cake refeshment!).

This service has proved to be very popular, so why not come along and see what you think?








February Rector’s Pages:  

Countdown to Easter (taken from the Church Support Hub)

   Pancake Day, Lent and Holy Week are all part of the journey to Easter Day, the biggest Christian celebration of the year. It is a time when lots of people make time to think carefully about their life. For Christians, this means trying to live God’s way and remembering all that Jesus did.
   Pancake Day is also called Shrove Tuesday and is one last chance for a big party before Lent begins with Ash Wednesday the next day. Long ago, Christians traditionally used up all the eggs and fat they had in store by making pancakes and feasting on them. This was because when Lent came, they would eat less food, or even fast (do without food sometimes) to help them focus on God and not on the things they wanted. This tradition has been passed down the generations. Shrove Tuesday always falls 47 days before Easter, a date which changes every year. This year, we’ll be eating our pancakes on Tue 25th February, before Lent begins with Ash Wednesday on 26th.
   Why is Lent important? Lent is a time of getting ready for Easter. When Jesus was just getting started with his work, he went into the desert for 40 days to be alone with God. He even went without food and prayed, and was tempted away from what God wanted him to do in all kinds of ways, but he resisted that temptation. You can read that story in the Bible: Matthew 4:1-11.
   During Lent, Christians often do something different too, like praying every day or reading the Bible. This reminds us of Jesus’ time in the desert to focus just on God and feel closer to him. The good news is that Sundays are still celebration days – so you can take a break from fasting!
   The last week of Lent is called Holy Week – during this time, the church remembers Jesus’ death on a cross.
   Your church in Lent. Churches may look quite different during Lent. You might notice the colour purple, or there may be very few decorations or flowers. This is because it’s a time to concentrate on God and remember how Jesus gave up his life on a cross to save all of us. Because Lent is a time to reflect, church music and songs will tend to be more reflective and services won’t ever include the word ‘Alleluia’ – a very joyful word to express praise for God. It’s a big contrast when Easter Day arrives, when the colourful decorations come out, there’s lots of celebration, ‘Alleuias’ and joyful music!
   Why not go along to a church service in Lent and play a game of spot-the-difference – how is it different to other services you have been to? Then go at Easter and play again! Talk about how each service feels and why they have these different moods. Come and join us at our Lent and Easter church services advertised in this monthly magazine.




FIRST SUNDAY SERVICES

Sunday 1st March 
Barrington - 5.00pm Experimental Worship in Barrington Boar
Cudworth - 11.15am Modern Communion
Dowlish Wake - 08.45am 1662 Communion 
Kingstone - 10.00am Family Service
Shepton Beauchamp - 10.30am Modern Communion




OTHER SERVICES 

ASH WEDNESDAY - 26th February
Ash Wednesday Prayers and Holy Communion 
- 30 minutes at the start of Lent
10.30am at Kingstone
10.30am at Shepton
11.30am at Barrington

Sunday at 2nd February and 1st March 5.00pm
An experiment in worship!
Because churches are usually very cold during winter evenings we thought we’d do something a bit warmer!  So on 2nd February and 1st March at 5.00pm we will be holding a service in the Barrington Boar public house (with thanks for the offer of hospitality to the licensees Alasdair and Victoria).   
The service will be a time of hymns, prayer, readings and refreshment (so bring a couple of quid for a cuppa!).

This service has proved to be very popular, so why not come along and see what you think?  It is open to everyone, not just Barringtonians!










Weekday Services

Shepton on Tuesdays at 10.30am.
The venue changes as we meet in peoples homes and have a cuppa afterwards; ring Rev’d Geoff (240228) if you’d like to come along.
This service is a 20 minutes, simple Communion Service.
+++++

Dowlish Wake on Wednesdays at 8.30am
No service during colder months of January and February
More details: Jayne Hinds on 55748, or email: jayne.hinds@btinternet.com
+++++

Buttle Close Common Room - Shepton Beauchamp
We meet at 11.30am on the first Thursday of each month in the Common Room of Buttle Close for a short, gentle service of prayers, hymns, readings and a story.   Everyone is very welcome.
+++++


DATES FOR YOUR DIARY:  have a quiet time during January!

From the Church Records:

28th December 2019   Annemieke Wigmore, 73 years, funeral service and burial at her beloved village church, Cudworth.

2nd January 2020   Ray Ball, 83 years, funeral service in church at Shepton Beauchamp, a village loved, followed by cremation at Yeovil.

3rd January   Brenda Rieley, 68 years, cremation at Yeovil followed by a Thanksgiving Service in her village church, Stocklinch.

6th January   “Jo” Josephine Scamell, 54 years, cremation at Taunton followed by a Thanksgiving Service at Ilminster church

January   Kenneth Christie, 92 years, cremation followed by a humanist memorial service at the Pavilion, Dowlish Wake.

10th January   Ena Hawkins, 92 years, burial with her late husband Escort, in Shepton Beauchamp church-yard.


LENT COURSES

Lent begins on 26th February and this year there will be three courses available.

Canon Ian Gibson is offering the following:

Held in Shepton Beauchamp church, for four Wednesdays evenings starting in March ;“Unravelling the mystery of the CofE in about 40  minutes!”
The curious titles we use for those who serve – Rector or Vicar? – Curate Deacon, Ordinand, Bishop etc etc.
Why on earth do we use such names as Parish, Deanery, Diocese, Provinces, Livings etc etc.
Morning Prayer or Mattins, Said or Sung, Mass or Lords Supper – any difference?, etc etc.
What are saints and apostles, disciples, martyrs. Commemorations – does the lectionary make sense to a layman – what’s a lectionary!

Starting with tea and buns and ending with short night prayer…..

Reader Jayne Hinds is offering two Lent courses over 5 weeks in March

1. 'Redeeming Love': 5 sessions using Lent-themed paintings to informally explore something of God's loving purposes through Jesus' final days. This will be available on Tuesday afternoons or evenings, beginning on 3rd March.

2. 'Finding a Voice': 5 sessions based on the film 'The King's Speech'. This will be available on Wednesday afternoons or evenings, beginning 4th March.

Both take place at Bridge Cottage, Dowlish Wake, TA19 0NY. Home-made refreshments on arrival and the session lasts for 1 hour.

Spaces are limited so if you are interested, please email Jayne on jayne.hinds@btinternet.com or telephone 01460 55748 and leave a message with your contact details.



FRIENDS OF MANJUSHREE VIDYAPITH SCHOOL AND ORPHANAGE (by Rev’d  Geoff)
  You may remember that many of us and our churches have supported this amazing charity in northern India for some time, with a lot of input from trustee Di Gallagher in Dowlish Wake.   The latest newsletter is available on our own website   http://winsmoor.blogspot.com/

   Di writes, “As you know, my mountain travelling days are over and I am stepping back from a fair bit of the admin of the charity.   This year, David Brown and Grainne Purkis have written the newsletter.  They have both been to Manjushree this year, Grainne for two visits, so they are much better equipped to bring you up to date than I am!

   The genuine support and interest of family and friends has provided a solid foundation for our work with the children - we could not have done it without you!  Now, a lot is changing but we can all feel proud that we have launched a lot of very special young people into the world - and they themselves are now giving back to their home and young siblings.”

   On a personal note, writes Rev’d Geoff (!), what is so good about this charity, on top of the amazing work they do with children, is the sense of family and responsibility that the school inspires in pupils.  Over the years we have supported it, I have watched their children be educated and lovingly cared for and then be sent out into the wider world to become “model citizens” who take a very keen interest in supporting their alma mater, so that even more children benefit and grow.  They really are making the world a better place, one small step at a time.












FOR DOWLISH WAKE PAGES PLEASE


St. Andrew’s Church, Dowlish Wake – Prayer Board
The Prayer board is near the font.
Please place any prayers for healing on the board 
and these will be included during the weekly
Wednesday morning prayer time.  



FOR BARRINGTON PAGES PLEASE


Sunday at 2nd February and 1st March 5.00pm
An experiment in worship!
Because churches are usually very cold during winter evenings we thought we’d do something a bit warmer!  So on 2nd February and 1st March at 5.00pm we will be holding a service in the Barrington Boar public house (with thanks for the offer of hospitality to the licensees Alasdair and Victoria).   
The service will be a time of hymns, prayer, readings and refreshment (so bring a couple of quid for a cuppa!).

This service has proved to be very popular, so why not come along and see what you think?  It is open to everyone, not just Barringtonians!




FOR SHEPTON PAGES PLEASE

St Michael’s Church news

It seems a long time since the ever-popular ‘Happening’ carol service took place. It was great to see the church packed, and so many children taking part. We hope the induction loop hearing system recently installed in the church enabled some of the congregation to enjoy it even more fully.

We are now back into our usual rota of services, as shown on the back cover. Don’t forget that on the second Sunday of each month, tea/coffee and refreshments are provided after the half-hour ‘Worship for All’ service. Even if you haven’t attended the service, you’re still welcome to join us.

Views from the pews

Mud, mud, glorious mud! We’ve had our fair share of it during the past couple of months. Our lovely footpaths became slippery, sticky assault courses, while sodden fields have been a nightmare for local farmers.

There’s a saying that ‘mud sticks’. It sure does, on your wellies. But it can also mean that when something bad is said about someone, people will continue to believe it, although it may have been proved to be untrue. That’s sad.

Is there anything good to say about mud? Well, it’s often used beauty treatments.  Many a salon uses mud products for hair and skin problems. So it can serve a useful purpose sometimes!

Concentrating wholly on the negative and ignoring the positive in any given situation can’t be good for us.

Back to the mud - I wonder if the Shepton variety could make a good, anti-ageing face mask? We could even raise funds for the church! Now there’s a thought … !


January Rector’s Pages:  

“Mum, why is a church the shape it is?”
   Well, Mum may not know but there is a reason – so in this brief article we shall give a few clues as to what makes the inside of a regular church the way it appears.
   Last time I explained the orientation of the church facing east, but what of the shape and contents we see as we enter. 
The shape of a church that was built up to the Victorian era was normally based on the old Roman Hall of justice, the Basilica. Modern churches can be a different shape to suit modern worship, but most old churches around here, especially Anglican,  are built on a similar shape.
   The central avenue, the Nave – named after the Latin navis – possibly a symbol relating to the church as the ark, is the place of procession from the west end of the church and also where the seating for the congregation is placed. Initially there were no seats for the members of the congregation, they stood, apart from those who were infirm. People could move freely around the church during the service. It was about the thirteenth century when benches, with no backs, were introduced, then later with backs which focussed the people towards the pulpit and the altar rather than distract. Over the twentieth century, when church going was the norm, the practice of pew renting – nominally thought to be the domain of the rich and landed gentry, but in fact more likely to be the middle class who wished to impress, was apparent. You could rent a pew and only you and your chosen guests could sit there!               Thankfully, things have changed. Nowadays individual chairs can also be seen as church buildings are used for alternatives outside of worship times.
What we arrive at next is the choir and chancel area of the church, sometimes separated by steps to arrive at the place where the clergy and the choir would sing or say the daily prayers and the ministry of the word would begin the service of Holy Communion. The two individual stalls are, to this day, the place of the titular clergy of the parish and their assistant. The stall on the right hand side represents the senior clergy officer. The choir sit facing each other as the daily prayers were and are said or sung antiphonally, one side saying the odd verses of the psalm and canticles and the other the even.
Next port of call is the Sanctuary. This area, once reserved for the clergy and the servers, is the place where the altar – the place where the priest in church can honour God with offerings and recall the last actions of Jesus at the last Supper – at the Eucharist, the thanksgiving. The altar is usually raised and placed against the east wall, but also can be seen frequently nowadays in the body of the church surrounded by the people.
Pulpits and lecterns, windows and paintings and statues – well that’s next time….



Deanery Open Meetings

The next Open Meeting is on Wed 29th January at Haselbury Plucknett Church; the speaker will be from the “Safe Families for Children” project    ( https://www.safefamiliesforchildren.com ).
7.00pm refreshments, 7.30pm start, 8.30pm finish. 
EVERYONE WELCOME





FIRST SUNDAY SERVICES

Sunday 1st December  
Barrington - 5.00pm Experimental Worship in Barrington Boar
Cudworth - 11.15am Modern Communion
Dowlish Wake - 08.45am 1662 Communion 
Kingstone - 10.00am Family Service
Shepton Beauchamp - 10.30am Modern Communion




OTHER SERVICES 

Sunday 5th January at 5.00pm
An experiment in worship!
Because churches are usually very cold during winter evenings we thought we’d do something a bit warmer!  So on 5th January and 2nd February at 5.00pm we will be holding a service in the Barrington Boar public house (with thanks for the offer of hospitality to the licensees Alasdair and Victoria).   
The service will be a time of hymns, prayer, readings and refreshment (so bring a couple of quid for a cuppa!).

This service has proved to be very popular, so why not come along and see what you think?  It is open to everyone, not just Barringtonians!





Weekday Services

Shepton on Tuesdays at 10.30am.
The venue changes as we meet in peoples homes and have a cuppa afterwards; ring Rev’d Geoff (240228) if you’d like to come along.
This service is a 20 minutes, simple Communion Service.
+++++

Dowlish Wake on Wednesdays at 8.30am
No service during colder months of January and February
More details: Jayne Hinds on 55748, or email: jayne.hinds@btinternet.com
+++++

Buttle Close Common Room - Shepton Beauchamp
We meet at 11.30am on the first Thursday of each month in the Common Room of Buttle Close for a short, gentle service of prayers, hymns, readings and a story.   Everyone is very welcome.
+++++





DATES FOR YOUR DIARY:  have a quiet time during January!

From the Church Records:

7th December   Imogen Blackmore; holy baptism at her family church of Kingstone.

10th December    Eileen Stoker, 85 years; funeral service at Yeovil Crematorium.











ITS A BIT EARLY BUT.....

Lent begins on 26th February and this year there will be three courses available.

Canon Ian Gibson is offering the following:

Held in Shepton Beauchamp church, for four Wednesdays evenings in March ;“Unravelling the mystery of the CofE in about 40  minutes!”
The curious titles we use for those who serve – Rector or Vicar? – Curate Deacon, Ordinand, Bishop etc etc.
Why on earth do we use such names as Parish, Deanery, Diocese, Provinces, Livings etc etc.
Morning Prayer or Mattins, Said or Sung, Mass or Lords Supper – any difference?, etc etc.
What are saints and apostles, disciples, martyrs. Commemorations – does the lectionary make sense to a layman – what’s a lectionary!

Starting with tea and buns and ending with short night prayer…..

Reader Jayne Hinds is offering two Lent courses over 5 weeks in March

1. 'Redeeming Love': 5 sessions using Lent-themed paintings to informally explore something of God's loving purposes through Jesus' final days. This will be available on Tuesday afternoons or evenings, beginning on 3rd March.

2. 'Finding a Voice': 5 sessions based on the film 'The King's Speech'. This will be available on Wednesday afternoons or evenings, beginning 4th March.

Both take place at Bridge Cottage, Dowlish Wake, TA19 0NY. Home-made refreshments on arrival and the session lasts for 1 hour.

Spaces are limited so if you are interested, please email Jayne on jayne.hinds@btinternet.com or telephone 01460 55748 and leave a message with your contact details.









From Thomas Cook Holidays - listing some guests' genuine complaints during the season

1. "I think it should be explained in the brochure that the local store does not sell proper biscuits like custard creams or ginger nuts."

2. "It's lazy of the local shopkeepers to close in the afternoons. I often needed to buy things during 'siesta' time - this should be banned."

3. "On my holiday to Goa in India , I was disgusted to find that almost every restaurant served curry. I don't like spicy food at all."

4. "We booked an excursion to a water park but no-one told us we had to bring our swimming costumes and towels."

5. "The beach was too sandy."

6. "We found the sand was not like the sand in the brochure. Your brochure shows the sand as yellow but it was white."

7. "No-one told us there would be fish in the sea. The children were startled."

8. "There was no egg slicer in the apartment..."

9. "We went on holiday to Spain and had a problem with the taxi drivers as they were all Spanish."

10. "The roads were uneven.."







FOR DOWLISH WAKE PAGES PLEASE





St. Andrew’s Church, Dowlish Wake – Prayer Board
The Prayer board is near the font.
Please place any prayers for healing on the board 
and these will be included during the weekly
Wednesday morning prayer time.  



FOR BARRINGTON PAGES PLEASE


Sunday 5th January at 5.00pm
An experiment in worship!
Because churches are usually very cold during winter evenings we thought we’d do something a bit warmer!  So on 5th January and 2nd February at 5.00pm we will be holding a service in the Barrington Boar public house (with thanks for the offer of hospitality to the licensees Alasdair and Victoria).   
The service will be a time of hymns, prayer, readings and refreshment (so bring a couple of quid for a cuppa!).

This service has proved to be very popular, so why not come along and see what you think?  It is open to everyone, not just Barringtonians!