Wednesday, 20 June 2018

Web Magazine - June and July edition - Rector's Pages

Rector’s Pages:  July  

 Rev’d D’ fyfe writes.....

Are slugs good or bad?  From my point of view, as I write this, the answer is simple….bad.  For the last few nights they have been munching their way through my runner bean seedlings.  I have tried most of the recommended ways of getting rid of them – the slugs, not the beans!  Broken egg shells did the trick around the courgettes, but I don’t eat enough eggs to supply the beans with adequate protection!  Honey in water or beer in a jar was not a very good idea.   You cannot ring-fence a row of beans with copper wire. I am reduced to contemplating the unthinkable – blue pellets!
What has this got to do with the front page of the Web?  It is a question of good and bad.  I suspect it is called ethics if you are doing a degree!  When is my good more important than someone or something else’s good?  In this case I have decided that my beans are more important than the slugs’ dinner.  My future dinner comes before their present dinner.  (If the pigeons join in the “eat the beans project”, I lose anyway!)
Yes, I’m being flip: but there are moral decisions that we make, which involve our good against someone else’s good.  When we look at the world and the distribution of food and resources, we realise that inequality is a major factor in creating unrest. The migrants who are pouring into Europe come for a number of reasons.  There are refugees fleeing from persecution and war.  They need help and they need it now.  Do we ignore their plight?   Economic migrants are coming because they are hungry.  There are categories of hunger.  Some are hungry for food and some are hungry for a better life.  We all know this, but we don’t know what we can do about it.  I’m stating the obvious, but sadly I don’t have the solution.  
People are not slugs.  If they are hungry, they need food.  Yes, it would be far better if they could have food in their own lands and not feel the need to look elsewhere.  If you are suffering, someone else’s land always looks better than your own.   But, who wants to leave home and family and trek for miles across desert or through war torn countries?  Answer:  only those who are desperate.
As Christians we are called on to look for a solution.  If it involves less for us and more for them, so be it.  Christian charities appeal for money, so that they can help people where they are. This has to be part of the solution.   But, when countries are in turmoil it may not be possible to help on the ground.   We cannot turn our backs on suffering because it makes us feel queasy.  If there is poverty on our doorsteps we have a moral obligation to help.  The world is now our doorstep.
There is a moral dilemma.  Have we partly created their problems?  Is it actually a question of balancing our lifestyle against their lives?  Should we reduce our good life so that others can have an improved life?  
One thing we can do is to pray.  We can pray for the tide of humanity that does not have a home.  This includes those in our country, now, as well as the mass exodus advancing on Europe.  We can pray for the people who do care and who go out to find the lost and the lonely, wherever they are.
And we can offer our help to the charities who are caring for the hungry wherever they are.  It comes down to pray and pay.
People are not slugs.


FIRST SUNDAY SERVICES:
Sunday 5th August
Barrington - 6.00pm Evensong 
Cudworth - 11.15am Modern Communion
Dowlish Wake - 08.45am 1662 Communion 
Kingstone - 10.00am Family Service
Shepton Beauchamp - 10.30am Modern Communion


OTHER SERVICES:
SUNDAY 29TH JULY - a fifth Sunday
Two services for all our villages.....

11.00am   Ottersey Stocklinch Church
Service of praise and song followed by a picnic.
&
6.00pm   Jubilee Field Chillington (off A30)
Songs of Praise for the beautiful Somerset countryside
(directions - A30 from Crewkerne to Chard; just before the turning to Winsham (on left) and big lay-by where the council store the gravel (on right), look for a car and day-glo jacket on the right
+++++

Buttle Close Common Room - Shepton Beauchamp
We meet at 11.30am on the first Thursday of each month in the Common Room of Buttle Close for a short, gentle service of prayers, hymns, readings and a story.   Everyone is very welcome.
+++++

Weekday Communions
Shepton on Tuesdays at 10.30am.
The venue changes as we meet in peoples homes and have a cuppa afterwards; ring Rev’d Geoff (240228) if you’d like to come along.
This service is a 20 minutes, simple Communion Service.
+++++






DATES FOR YOUR DIARY:

Saturday 4th August
Dowlish Wake Duck Race
In aid of Dowlish and Chillington churches running costs
+++++

Wednesday 15th August
Cudworth annual Summer Market
In aid of church running costs
+++++


From the Church Registers

26th May
Maisie Noyce, holy baptism at Shepton Beauchamp.
1st June
Peter Parsons 86 years; funeral service at Shepton Beauchamp, followed by burial at his beloved Stocklinch church.
2nd June
Lynda Peppercorn & Ivan Bassett, joined in holy matrimony at Shepton Beauchamp.
Marion Pollard, thanksgiving service for a full and loving life, held at Dowlish Wake.
6th June
Kenneth Mayes 89 years; funeral service at Kingstone.
13th June
Molly Packham, for many years resident of Stocklinch, 97 years; funeral service at Taunton Crematorium.
16th June
Lewis Martin & Danielle Rockett, joined in holy matrimony at her family church in Dowlish Wake.






The Funny Side

So what if I don’t know the meaning of the word, “apocalypse”?  It’s not the end of the world.
Police were called to a day care centre.   It seems a three year old was resisting a rest.
The other day I held a door open for a clown.   I thought it was a nice jester.
If you need an ark to save two of every animal, I Noah guy.
Alternative facts are aversion of the truth.
I used to have a fear of hurdles, but I got over it.

REPRESENTING THE PEOPLE OF GOD

There is currently a vacancy for a worshipping member of our churches to represent the ordinary people of God at the highest levels in our Diocese.

The job title is "Deanery Lay Chair” of Crewkerne Deanery; a deanery is a district within the C of E; lay means someone who is not ordained as a priest or deacon.

Each parish is encouraged to send representatives to the Deanery meetings which happen three times a year.   The Lay Chair represents the views of these reps, to Archdeacons and Bishops.   This can either be done simply by listening and talking to the parish reps or by visiting churches from time to time and talking to parishioners.

This deanery leadership role is shared with the Rural Dean (Rev’d Geoff Wade from the winsmoor Benefice), who represents the clergy in the same way.   It is important that these two people work closely together.

It is an interesting job and an important one; if the Bishops and their staff are to “govern” the diocese effectively and fairly they must hear the voice of the people loudly and clearly.   The job can be as simple or as time-consuming as the candidates wish, there is no fixed way of doing the task!   Similarly the job could easily be shared between two or three people,

For more information, a chat (without committing yourself!) and/or specific Terms of Reference, please speak to your clergy or contact Rev’d Geoff directly (gw@winsmoor.plus.com   01460 240 228)






CHAPLAIN (Lay or ordained)  - required as soon as possible

Wadham School
A Church of England Community School
Business and Enterprise College
Age range 13-18 NOR 497

We seek an appropriately qualified and experienced person to help us further develop the Christian character of the school.

Part time:  15 hours.  Term time only plus 45 hours 
Salary:  Grade 12 Point 22  (Actual £7,949 - pay award pending)
For 3 years initially

Wadham serves the market towns of Crewkerne and Ilminster and surrounding villages.

For further details/application form please see the school website www.wadhamschool.co.uk email the Headteacher’s PA, Mrs T Saunders at tsaunders@wadhamschool.co.uk or telephone the school of 01460 270123.

There is an occupation requirement that the postholder is a Christian.  Appointment subject to enhanced DBS disclosure.

There is also the possibility of a part time position alongside this post of Families and Schools worker. If this is something you would like to pursue please contact Reverend Stuart Huntley, Rector at St Bartholomew’s Church - email: revshuntley@gmail.com








Rector’s Pages:  June 
Eulogy in an English Churchyard (by Linda Piggott-Vijeh)

   There can be few more tranquil settings than the peace and quiet of an English country church on a bright spring morning. Dappled sunlight flooding through the stained-glass windows, settling on empty pews. Once at the heart of the community, the presence of the church in our daily lives has now largely been side-lined by our worship at the altar of consumerism. We are all too busy being busy, except when the chips are down. It is then that we turn, almost as a last resort, to God in the hope that he will sort it all out.
   Whilst I have been a ‘regular’ church goer for some years now, I freely admit to taking a pick and mix approach to my own attendance; variety is after all the spice of life. I particularly enjoy those ‘special’ services held at certain times of the year, expanding the concept of faith and belief beyond the usual boundaries of prayer and worship.
   Thus it was that over the Bank Holiday weekend, I found myself part of a bustling group of 100 or so from the surrounding villages, gathered together at Cudworth church. All of us milling around with bacon or sausage baps in hand, gearing ourselves up for what proved to be rather a long walk, for me at least.
I was surrounded by people of all age groups, from tiny tots to tottering oldies, landed gentry and local farming folk, newcomers and old stalwarts, and everything in between. We are all equal in the eye of God. There was a very fetching line in walking sticks, walking boots and wellies, with khaki being the colour of the day, along with a Heinz variety of well-behaved pooches in tow. Not your average church service then. Many of this merry bunch, including me, had been transported, by horse trailer, packed in like sardines, perched precariously on haybales from nearby Chillington to take part in the annual bluebell wood walk across the fields of neighbouring farms.
   But first the serious stuff, a short (very short) Rogation service conducted by the affable Rector, Rev. Geoff Wade., as we gave thanks for all of the good things that the soil, with a little help from nature, nurtures us with. It was standing room only; barely space for the wagging of doggy tails in time to ‘Morning Has Broken’ and ‘We Plough the Fields and Scatter’. As I observed my fellow congregants, the thought occurred to me that yes, organising such activities takes up a lot of time and energy, and is reliant upon a willing band of volunteers to bring it all together. But, if this is what it takes to fill our churches, then bring it on.
   As we trooped off into the countryside, across the verdant undulating landscape, avoiding the odd muddy puddle (note to self, wear wellies next time), with nothing but the bleating of sheep to interrupt our thoughts, I felt refreshed and uplifted. A feeling no doubt aided by the unaccustomed exercise. Unused to anything but the most gentle form of exertion, I did avail myself of the trailer for some of the return journey, noting that my fellow occupants were almost exclusively youngsters. Clearly the younger generation is without the stamina of the octogenarians, who ploughed on gallantly, unhindered by aching hips and knees. Homemade cake was our reward on arriving at Chillington, which along with the raffle raised several hundred pounds; not to be sniffed at.
   A townie by birth, living in Somerset, still largely a rural county, I treasured this opportunity to reflect upon this brief interlude. A moment of tranquillity and collective harmony in an otherwise troubled world is something that we can, and should, all give our heartfelt thanks for.





FIRST SUNDAY SERVICES:
Sunday 3rd June
Barrington - 6.00pm Evensong 
Cudworth - 11.15am Modern Communion
Dowlish Wake - 08.45am 1662 Communion 
Kingstone - 10.00am Family Service
Shepton Beauchamp - 10.30am Modern Communion


OTHER SERVICES:

Buttle Close Common Room - Shepton Beauchamp
We meet at 11.30am on the first Thursday of each month in the Common Room of Buttle Close for a short, gentle service of prayers, hymns, readings and a story.   Everyone is very welcome.
+++++


Weekday Communions
Shepton on Tuesdays at 10.30am.
The venue changes as we meet in peoples homes and have a cuppa afterwards; ring Rev’d Geoff (240228) if you’d like to come along.

This service is 2o minutes long, simple Communion Service to reflect, 
pray and give thanks.
+++++





DATES FOR YOUR DIARY:

Monday 4th June - Stocklinch Village Hall
Deanery Open Meeting - 7.00 for 7.30pm start
This meeting centres on a talk by Tracey Warren (a very engaging speaker) from Stoodley’s Funeral Directors, who will talk on “Dying Matters - dying, death and bereavement”.
+++++

Saturday and Sunday 23rd/24th June
Stocklinch Village Summer Show
Watch out for further details!!!!
+++++


From the Church Registers

Sat 28th April
Megan Bauld and James Aldridge, joined in holy matrimony at Shepton Beauchamp.
Thu 3rd April
Molly Welch’s (a long time resident of Barrington and organist at the church there) ashes laid to rest with her late husband at Puckington church.
Wed 10th April
Frieda Blamey, 79 years, funeral service at Yeovil Crematorium.



The Funny Side

The meaning of opaque is unclear.
I wasn’t going to get a brain transplant, but then I changed my mind.
Have you ever tried to eat a clock?   It’s very time consuming.
A man tried to assault me with milk, cream and butter.   How diary!
I’m reading a book about ant-gravity; I just can’t put it down.
If there was someone selling marijuana in our neighbourhood, weed know about it.
It’s a lengthy article about ancient Japanese sword fighters but it’s easy to Sumurais.



ATTENTION ADULTS WHO WORK WITH CHILDREN 
AND VULNERABLE PEOPLE
FOR THE LOCAL CHURCHES

If you work for your local church in any capacity where you come into regular contact with children or vulnerable adults (perhaps as a  visitor or bell-ringer) in any capacity, you may need DBS clearance for your own well-being as well as for those vulnerable people you may work with.    

A local course on Safeguarding has been arranged at South Petherton Church on 

Wednesday 13th June from 6.3p - 9.00pm.   (a C1 course) 
Wednesday 4th July from 6.3p - 9.00pm.   (a C2 course)

If you would like to attend please contact Rev’d D’ Fyfe (01460 241977   dbfyfe@btinternet.com ) to book on the course.   If you are unsure whether or not you need one, contact your Vicar or Tower Captain.



A VERY BIG THANK YOU to everyone who worked for and supported:

Barrington Church hosting the village Community Coffee Morning on 28th April; £200 raised for church running costs.
Kingstone Church May Fair on 5th May, a lovely event in the sunshine of the Bank Holiday, raised £1479 for church running costs.
Dowlish Wake Church Plant Sale on 12th May, raised raised £735 for church running costs.



THE HIDING PLACE - The Corrie ten Boom Story
In their latest production, Oddments Theatre Company, Yeovil, brings  to life ‘The Hiding Place’ – the inspirational and heart wrenching testimony of Corrie ten Boom. Corrie, born on April 15, 1892 in Haarlem, Holland, and her Christian family are outraged at the German occupation in the Second World War, and the constant persecution of the Jewish community. They join thousands of others in the unceasing resistance of God’s underground. Their refusal to stand by and watch the Nazi’s horrendous onslaught, and their faith which prevails throughout their subsequent suffering, continue to inspire all who encounter Corrie’s incredible story. 
Oddments are one of the few full-time Christian Theatre Companies in the UK.  They are a registered charity reaching out to churches, schools, and prisons. The Hiding Place is brought to you by a production team of five performers who, alongside an exciting, rotating stage set, music, and lively stage action, will make you laugh before they make you cry. 
Very highly rated by previous audiences, this passionate story of God's love and hope in an environment of darkness and brutality will enthral you.
Performance at St Michael and All Angels Church, Haselbury Plucknett, Friday 1 June 2018, 7.30 pm
Tickets online at oddments-theatre.co.uk or from 01460 76450 – Price £10 or £12 at the door.



CHAPLAIN (Lay or ordained)  - required as soon as possible

Wadham School
A Church of England Community School
Business and Enterprise College
Age range 13-18 NOR 497

We seek an appropriately qualified and experienced person to help us further develop the Christian character of the school.

Part time:  15 hours.  Term time only plus 45 hours 
Salary:  Grade 12 Point 22  (Actual £7,949 - pay award pending)
For 3 years initially

Wadham serves the market towns of Crewkerne and Ilminster and surrounding villages.

For further details/application form please see the school website www.wadhamschool.co.uk email the Headteacher’s PA, Mrs T Saunders at tsaunders@wadhamschool.co.uk or telephone the school of 01460 270123.

There is an occupation requirement that the postholder is a Christian.  Appointment subject to enhanced DBS disclosure.

There is also the possibility of a part time position alongside this post of Families and Schools worker. If this is something you would like to pursue please contact Reverend Stuart Huntley, Rector at St Bartholomew’s Church - email: revshuntley@gmail.com

Closing date for application:  4 June 2018







For Dowlish Wake Pages PLEASE

The Late Marion Pollard - Memorial Service

Roger and his sons have arranged for a Memorial Service to be held at Dowlish Wake church on Saturday 2nd June at 2.00pm.   Everyone is welcome to attend to celebrate the life of this lovely woman who is sadly missed.   There will be light refreshments in the Speke Hall after the service.






Monday, 30 April 2018

Rector’s Pages:    The persecuted church and how to support it.
This month, an interview with Mike Simpson, the chief executive officer of FRRME (Foundation for Relief and Reconciliation in the Middle East) focusing on FRRME’s involvement in Jordan.

Last year you were appointed CEO of FRRME. What does the role cover?
Over the last six months I have met many Iraqi refugees, IDPs (Internally Displaced People) and others we support. Thousands have lost their homes and their communities, along with almost all they possessed, after they fled from ISIS. Most are in need of significant restoration in their lives. My role includes advocating for these often forgotten people with government, churches and individual Christians. This might be meeting in Parliament with political leaders or with the British ambassador in Baghdad or giving talks in churches around the UK. I support and direct the staff team at home and abroad, under the governance of our trustees. I also work to develop inter-religious dialogue, for example meeting the leading Shia Muslim cleric Hussein Al-Sadr when I was in Baghdad in February.

What is FRRME’s involvement in Jordan?
We support over 5,000 Christian Iraqi refugees in Jordan. We work in partnership with four local churches of very different denominations: Syrian Orthodox, Greek Catholic, Evangelical and Pentecostal.

Are FRRME working on the ground with the Christian Iraqi refugee community there?
Our support for the Christian Iraqi refugees includes food relief, English language teaching, provision of clothing and medicines and working with partner agencies to address the trauma suffered by many of these people who fled from ISIS.

What is life like for that community there?
It's very tough for them. Most left Iraq with virtually nothing and many have been badly traumatised by ISIS. As Iraqi refugees they are not allowed to work in Jordan and are very dependent on the support given by local churches and charities like ours.

What are the most pressing needs in that country?
There are practical, emotional and spiritual needs. We met with the UK Ambassador to Jordan recently to ask him to try to influence the Jordanian government to issue work permits to Iraqis and to enable Christian children to access suitable schooling. The trauma suffered by many who have been driven out of their own country is acute. Then there are the spiritual needs which the various churches are seeking to meet through manifesting the compassion of Christ and enabling people to grow in their faith.
Can you please say something about your most recent visit to Jordan?
Last month I met with church leaders in Jordan but also with individual families and I heard the moving stories of the tragedy of Iraq. Often it seems that the inner needs are much greater than the outer needs. Many are bereaved. They may not even know where relatives and friends are, because so many people disappeared under ISIS. There is a lot of trauma. Some are understandably bitter. There is huge uncertainty about the future. It brings to mind the wonderful words in Psalm 23, 'He restoreth my soul.' With the help of
our supporters and most importantly with God's grace we aim to help restore the souls of many people.

FRRME website    http://frrme.org    has videos and information about their work. The donate page has many different options for those wanting to support.   FRRME, PO Box 229, Petersfield, Hants, GU32 9DL, United Kingdom.



Sunday 6th May 2018 - Rogation Bluebell Walk
Cudworth to Chillington through the Bluebell Wood

09.40am - Tractor Transport from Chillington to Cudworth
(if you would like to leave your cars at Chillington)

10.00am - Light Breakfast at Cudworth Church
(£2 for sausage or bacon roll and hot drink)

10.30am  - Brief Rogation Service
10.40am - Walk begins

Coffee & Cake on arrival at Chillington
(Tractor Transport from Chillington to Cudworth 
if you have left you cars at the latter)


FIRST SUNDAY SERVICES:
Sunday 3rd June
Barrington - 6.00pm Evensong 
Cudworth - 11.15am Modern Communion
Dowlish Wake - 08.45am 1662 Communion 
Kingstone - 10.00am Family Service
Shepton Beauchamp - 10.30am Modern Communion


OTHER SERVICES:

Buttle Close Common Room - Shepton Beauchamp
We meet at 11.30am on the first Thursday of each month in the Common Room of Buttle Close for a short, gentle service of prayers, hymns, readings and a story.   Everyone is very welcome.
+++++

Weekday Communions
Shepton on Tuesdays at 10.30am.
The venue changes as we meet in peoples homes and have a cuppa afterwards; ring Rev’d Geoff (240228) if you’d like to come along.

This service is 2 minutes long, simple Communion Service to reflect, 
pray and give thanks.
+++++



DATES FOR YOUR DIARY:

Saturday 5th May - KINGSTONE
The famous “Kingstone May Fair” 
(see note later in this Web)
+++++

Saturday 12th May - DOWLISH WAKE
The Plant Sale!
2.30pm at the Pavilion on the playing fields.
+++++

Monday 4th June - Stocklinch Village Hall
Deanery Open Meeting - 7.00 for 7.30pm start
This meeting centres on a talk by Tracey Warren (a very engaging speaker) from Stoodley’s Funeral Directors, who will talk on “Dying Matters - dying, death and bereavement”.
+++++

Saturday and Sunday 23rd/24th June
Stocklinch Village Summer Show
Watch out for further details!!!!
+++++


ATTENTION BELL-RINGERS AND 
OTHERS WHO WORK WITH CHILDREN 
FOR THE LOCAL CHURCHES

If you work for your local church as a bell-ringer or in any other capacity, you may need DBS clearance for your own well-being as well as for those vulnerable people you may work with.    

A local course on Safeguarding has been arranged at South Petherton Church on 

Wednesday 13th June from 6.30pm - 9.00pm.   (a C1 course) 
Wednesday 4th July from 6.30pm - 9.00pm.   (a C2 course)

If you would like to attend please contact Rev’d D’ Fyfe (01460 241977   dbfyfe@btinternet.com ) to book on the course.   If you are unsure whether or not you need one, contact your Vicar or Tower Captain.


Visiting Skills Course

Do you visit people regularly?   The sick, lonely, bereaved?   As a member of your church or just because its the “right thing to do”?   Would you like to find out more about current thinking, recommended practices and good ideas into how to do this even better?   This course may help.....

Venue - South Petherton Church Date - beginning Wed 23rd May
Time - 7.00 for 7.30pm start; finish by 9.00pm

Session 1 - Introduction to Pastoral care; Who am I?                  
Session 2 - The Importance of Listening
Session 3 - Visiting the Sick
Session 4 - Bereavement
Session 5 - The Family
Session 6  - The Practicalities of Carrying Out a Visit; Safeguarding – local arrangements,etc.

Contact Rev’d Jonathan Morris: 01460 72356   jonbea@cooptel.net




A VERY BIG THANK YOU to everyone who worked for and supported:

The Stocklinch Easter Fete on 31st March, raising £460 for church funds.
The Coffee Morning at Derek’s on 14th April raised £304 towards repairs to the vestry roof, replacement flagpole and clock!  Thank you to Derek for hosting the event.



For Dowlish Wake  PLEASE

The Late Marion Pollard - Memorial Service

Roger and his sons have arranged for a Memorial Service to be held at Dowlish Wake church on Saturday 2nd June at 2.00pm.   Everyone is welcome to attend to celebrate the life of this lovely woman who is sadly missed.   There will be light refreshments in the Speke Hall after the service.




For Shepton  PLEASE


A big thank you from St Michael’s Church, Shepton Beauchamp

Now that winter is behind us, we have a brighter church following a major refurbishment of the lighting, paid for by local fundraising events and a legacy. Also, for the first time, at the flick of a switch, the grade 1 listed ceiling over the choir stalls and altar can be seen in all its glory. 

A day of spring-cleaning followed and a little team armed with vacuum cleaners, brushes, dusters and Marigolds made sure that the pews, floors and other surfaces were soon gleaming. Thank you so much to the village volunteers who gave up a chunk of their Saturday to help.

In the mean time, the new computerised bell system which cost £12,000 has been fully paid for, thanks to anonymous donations. It comes with a playlist (including ‘Happy Birthday’ and various carillons) plus an independent keyboard enabling any other tune to be played. If you were mystified to hear Christmas carols and ‘Oh Danny Boy’ coming from the church tower early this year, that was just a ‘name that tune’ test run! 


Easter 

Spring time was busy as usual for Father Geoff and for Joan, who went into school and recreated scenes from the Easter story during Holy Week. From palm crosses (remembering the way Jesus entered Jerusalem) to flatbreads and Ribena (the last supper), a variety of symbolic props brought the stories to life. Father Geoff’s Oscar-worthy performance in church as Jesus in ‘Temper in the temple’ mode was undoubtedly top of the bill!


Holy Week Church activities culminated on Easter Sunday with the morning service and communion led by Canon Ian Gibson.  ‘Henny’, of course, made her annual appearance and performed her chocolate egg-laying miracle.